Red Cabbage and Beetroot Sauerkraut
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Red Cabbage and Beetroot Sauerkraut

As well as being evidently far more vibrant than the more traditional white cabbage sauerkraut, this kraut has a bit more bite to its texture which makes it a great side to a roast dinner or sandwich component.

The sugars in the beetroot also give the fermented juice a great viscocity which I use in soups to add colour, tang and probiotic value. There are so many simple pleasures in making simple fermented foods such as this colourful Kraut.

  • Getting stuck in with our hands which are still the most efficient kitchen tools. Scrunching up cabbage feels really good.
  • Prepping outside – crisp air, warm autumnal light and curious friends (spot the wasp.)
  • Preserving the colours of autumn and taking them into winter when the landscape is often monochromatic.
  • Making food that your gut will thank you for, but more importantly tastes delicious and even better with time.
Red Cabbage and Beetroot Sauerkraut

Red Cabbage and Beetroot Sauerkraut

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Course: Side, FermentationCuisine: Eastern EuropeanDifficulty: Easy
Servings

2

large jars
Prep time

20

minutes
Fermentation time

3

days

The sugars in the beetroot also give the fermented juice a great viscocity which I use in soups to add colour, tang and probiotic value.

Ingredients

  • 1 red cabbage, finely shredded

  • 2 tbsp sea salt

  • 3 medium beets, peeled and coarsely grated

  • 1 tbsp cumin seeds/ mustard seeds/ juniper berries/ caraway seeds

Directions

  • Mix the cabbage and salt together in a bowl. Leave to stand for 10 minutes – moisture will begin to draw itself out.
  • Add the beets and your choice of spice/ aromatics. Mix with your hands, squeezing and gently pushing down as you do so. You’ll soon begin to see a vibrant purple juice being extracted.
  • Place the mixture in a large sterilised jar, pushing down firmly with your hands until there are no gaps.
  • Half fill a freezer bag with water and place it on top of the mix to keep it below the surface of the liquid.
  • Place the jar on a plate (to avoid purple leakage) and set aside in a cool, dark place for a 2-3 days. When you start to see bubbles, remove the bag, screw the lid on and chill in the fridge.
  • Use a sterile utensil when taking from the jar and make sure that you push everything below the liquid as much as you can before you put it back into the fridge.

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